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My talks

I started giving public and mostly IT-related talks in 2016. Until now (April 2020) I delivered over 75 talks in various formats, from Pecha Kucha (20 slides x 20 seconds each) to Deep Dive (2,5h long). I spoke in Poland and Europe, both small community events, both huge cinema rooms. Many of my talks (but not all of them) have both English and Polish versions. Some have been given many times, some just once, some were given awards, and all were made with passion.

In the dark ages, we had to wait for 3-4 years to see the new Java version with some new features. Now there are two major releases every year! Can we benefit from the new features before the next LTS release? We don’t have to wait 3 years or so for new features any more. Isn’t that cool? 😉 So… you’d like to check what has happened since Java 11? Record types?
Another (half a) year has passed, another major Java™ version has been released. Java was supposed “to be slow”. However, Java turns out to evolve so fast, that next releases aren’t just version bumps, but might significantly change the game rules. That’s a good reason for another deep dive in Java. We’re going to cover: Production ready GCs: ZGC and Shenandoah, if you don’t like ice ages Text blocks, which make Strings easy to declare also for non-liners Pattern matching with instanceof A.
Java 14 brought Records as one of the preview features. For many it was reasonable to say “no more JavaBeans code generation” or “Lombok is dead”. Is that really the case? What one can do with records and what can’t? What about reflection and serialization? This talk has been presented at AllTheTalks.online.
Hey, there are two major Java versions released every year! We don’t have to wait 3 years or so for new features any more. Isn’t that cool? ;-) So… would you like to check out what has happened in Java 14? Switch expressions available to public? No more NPEs? Record types? Pattern matching? Text blocks? If you find them interesting, let’s dive deep together into new interesting stuff. This talk has been presented at Wrocław JUG and Warszawa JUG.
Hey, there are two major Java versions released every year! We don’t have to wait 3 years or so for new features any more. Isn’t that cool? ;-) So… you’d like to check what has happened since Java 11? Switch expressions? Text blocks? New functions in String, Streams and other APIs? What are the Shenandoah and ZGC about? AppCDS to speed up spin-off? If you find them interesting, let’s dive deep together into new interesting stuff.
It’s (post) Java 11 time now. (Just in case your boss didn’t notice ;-)) In this talk, I’d like to tell you how I managed to migrate two real Java server apps to Java 11 and show some demos. Why was it done? How to convince the business? What and how was done? What wasn’t required? Does anyone read licenses, manuals, and talks’ descriptions? Where did I fail in the first approach?
How a developer can tell if the system is sick just by taking a look at the input and the output? If you’d like to know that (plus you like standup comedy), come and see! The treatment is safe ;-) One approach to get familiar with a system is a long and intense reading the manual (and to run an eye over the source code sometimes). Another approach is to take a deep dive into the data model (often in the DB) and to surf the user interface.
“The best sorting algorithm is quick sort." “Indexes make DB faster." “Data should be sorted using ORDER BY." “Composition - good; inheritance - not good." “Windows is an operating system." “You must have transactions in your DB." “Java is slow." “Don’t eat yellow snow." “You shall not self-sign your certificates." “Interrupt in Java is broken.” The IT world is full of mantras/revealed truth, passed (often in oral tradition) among developer tribes.
There are 10 kinds of people: the ones who already log stuff and the ones who will. ;-) But what can be fascinating about logging? It’s just adding some statements of given level to a file in /var/log, so what’s this presentation for in the fist place? Well, ordinary adding lines to /var/log and tracing them with tail -f or searching with grep is so… 1980 and inefficient. Meet Graylog: a centralised and distributed log management system.
Some say that keeping passwords in a [web] application is a boring and trivial task: some hashing, maybe some salt, et voilà! However, storing passwords and other sensitive data might not be as simple as it seems. You’ll see a bunch of examples of what to do and what not to do based on a freelance’s experience. Watch and see if you’re not sitting on a bomb. This talk (in various formats) has been presented at Chamberconf, 4Developers, Devoxx Poland, Wrocław JUG, Coffee JUG Lviv, jLabs Academy and others.

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